top of page
P3120028_edited.jpg

Our Work

The North Slave Métis Alliance’s Environment Department assists our leadership in fulfilling the organization’s mandate which is the “assertion, protection, and implementation of the Aboriginal rights of Métis people, and the exercise of Métis responsibility to protect the environment and to promote and enhance Métis education, economic, social, political, and cultural development.” 

Sash.jpg
P_20190827_131144.jpg

See what we do...

Our Team

Our team holds a diverse range of expertise and knowledge. They bring unique worldviews to our organization and represent the North Slave Métis at various meetings, engagement and consultation sessions, conferences, and workshops across the country. These individuals are committed to upholding Métis traditions, culture, and rights in their everyday life and decision-making. If you have any environmental related questions or wish to get involved in any of our programs, please reach out to us at lands@nsma.net

Environment Department Charter

Vision

nautical_compass_rose_classic_round_sticker-r33d1d5bac1f04db489e7d3f787f51262_0ugmp_8byvr_

The NSMA Environment Department aspires to help the NSMA become a fully recognized Indigenous Government with a finalized comprehensive claim agreement that plays an active role in environmental governance within the Northwest Territories. At the same time, the Environment Department aspires to provide effective services and opportunities related to its mission to support the needs of the NSMA community.

Mission

lines-art-three-mountain-with-circle-logo-symbol-icon-illustration-graphic-design-vector.j
  • Represent the NSMA as active participants in environmental and natural resource governance and consultation processes while ensuring adequate protection of Aboriginal rights and the environment, and socio-economic benefits for the NSMA.

  • Provide services and opportunities to members with a focus on enhancing community participation in environmental governance and consultation, environmental research, training and capacity building, cultural and on-the-land activities, and ensuring community resources such as the camp at Old Fort Rae remain available for use by the community.

  • Operate as a financially self-sufficient entity within NSMA by generating diversified revenue sources through contribution agreements for capacity funding and businesslike activities relating to contracts for environmental services.

Staff Promises

istockphoto-1239766678-612x612.jpg
  • We will collaborate with NSMA staff, community members, Indigenous groups, the public, and other organizations.

  • We will show respect for people, rights, ideas, and cultures.

  • We are goal-oriented and results-focused.

  • We are innovative and respond to changing information, circumstances, and community needs.

Sash.jpg

Our Priorities 

IMG_0024_edited.jpg

Bathurst Caribou 

Management & Monitoring 

The Bathurst herd has declined roughly 99% since 1986, with only 6,000 individuals estimated to be remaining. The Bathurst Caribou Advisory Committee, the Caribou Guardians Coalition, Range Planning, and the Habitat Conservation Workshop are comprised of Indigenous governments, Environment & Natural Resources, and other stakeholders to address this concern. Each of these groups bring knowledge holders and participants together to share knowledge and develop plans and policies to conserve the Bathurst herd. NSMA participates in various working groups related to Bathurst caribou alongside the GNWT, stakeholders, and fellow Indigenous groups.

IMG_0093.JPG

Boreal Caribou 

Management & Monitoring 

Boreal caribou live in the forests east of the Mackenzie Mountains. Their range covers more than 44 million hectares in the NWT and part of northeastern Yukon. Boreal caribou populations have decline in most of their ranges across Canada. In the NWT, boreal caribou are listed as a threatened species and their population is estimated to be between 6,000-7,000 individuals.

8C7CB8D7-B983-42E7-AB1D-005AC25360C7_edi

Wood Bison

Management & Monitoring 

Wood bison were reintroduced into the Mackenzie range back in 1963 near Fort Providence. The population has fluctuated due to disease (anthrax, brucellosis, and bovine tuberculosis), road collisions, and wildfires, but was on a steady incline from 1963 until 2012, when an anthrax outbreak reduced the population from an estimated 1,200 animals to about 500 animals. Harvesting for wood bison for the Mackenzie population was re-opened on Sept 1st, 2021 with a total allowable harvest of 40 bulls. NSMA sits on the Mackenzie Bison Working Group Committee and meets regularly with the group. Since the re-open of harvest, NSMA has been grant 4 tags per year.

IMG_6392.JPG

Guardianship Program

Management & Monitoring 

In 2021, we kickstarted our Guardianship Program. First, we deployed wildlife cameras across the North Slave region to develop a baseline of what species are present in key locations of interest to our membership. Next, we had several members complete regular patrols along the Tibbitt to Contwoyto Winter Road documenting everything they saw. Our goals: (1) Document wildlife presence across NSMA territory, particularly wildlife of high cultural and subsistence value; (2) Record any abnormalities observed in wildlife, fish, plants, etc. and investigate these changes if needed through our on the land incentive program; (3) Create a baseline record of this information to monitor changes year-to-year and whether a changing climate is having any effects; and (4) Get members on the land and reconnected with one another.

IMG_8930.HEIC

Regulatory Actions

NSMA’s responsibilities extend beyond the regulatory aspects of major mining projects within our traditional territory. We also actively engage with and review other miscellaneous projects (development or tourism-related projects) to ensure that our community's interests and environmental stewardship values are upheld throughout the decision-making processes. In addition to the comprehensive reviews of land and water use applications for these miscellaneous projects, our involvement encompasses analyzing and providing feedback on their engagement and communication activities.

Giant-Mine-Yellowknife-3684-e1540831313837.jpg

Giant Mine

Mining & Development

NSMA’s responsibilities extend beyond the regulatory aspects of major mining projects within our traditional territory. We also actively engage with and review other miscellaneous projects (development or tourism-related projects) to ensure that our community's interests and environmental stewardship values are upheld throughout the decision-making processes. In addition to the comprehensive reviews of land and water use applications for these miscellaneous projects, our involvement encompasses analyzing and providing feedback on their engagement and communication activities.

IMG_8941.HEIC

Gahcho Kué Mine

Mining & Development

Ni Hadi Xa, which brings together the North Slave Métis Alliance, Northwest Territory Métis Nation, Deninu Kue First Nation, Lutsel K'e Dene First Nation, Tłı̨chǫ Government, Yellowknives Dene First Nation, and De Beers Canada, combines on-site environmental monitoring, desktop technical reviews, and traditional knowledge monitoring to evaluate the mine's impacts. The Governance Committee, the central decision-making body of Ni Hadi Xa, comprises nominees from each signatory, all of whom possess extensive experience in lands, environmental, and regulatory matters.

IMG_8886.JPG

Diavik

Mining & Development

The North Slave Metis Alliance actively participates in the consultation process, providing recommendations and comments on various regulatory aspects associated with the Diavik Mine. Our recent contributions include participating in the Diavik closure and reclamation workshops review, as well as collaborating in the Environmental Agreement Signatory meetings aimed at developing a Traditional Knowledge (TK) watching and monitoring program for mine closure.

Snap-Lake-Mine.jpg

Snap Lake

Mining & Development

North Slave Métis Alliance’s role is to actively participate in the regulatory review processes pertaining to the Snap Lake Mine. The Government of the Northwest Territories (GNWT) consults with the NSMA on any relevant regulatory files or processes that require input from Indigenous parties. We provide our comments and expert insights to inform decision-making by the GNWT, ensuring that our community's voice is heard, and our unique perspectives are considered.

IMG_5135.jpg

Climate Change 

Internal Community Committee

NSMA is participating in the Indigenous Climate Leadership (ICL) co-development process with the Government of Canada to engage Indigenous people in climate policy. We will be holding workshops and meetings with membership to identify priorities, needs and concerns related to environmental changes in NSMA’s traditional territory.

IMG_3498.jpg

Community Advisory Committee

Internal Community Committee

The CAC was developed in 2021 and is comprised of 10 NSMA community members. Each member of this Committee holds a distinct set of skills, experience, and know they want to share within the NSMA Community and beyond. The CAC is tasked with various projects on an as needed basis and meet on a monthly to bi-weekly basis. Some tasks include: wildlife co-management, industry engagement, development of internal documents and protocols and more. If any members are interested in joining the Committee, please reach out.

IMG_4396.jpg

Community Garden

In 2023, we developed a community garden at our office (32 Melville Drive). for  our community members. In addition, we collaborated with the Yellowknife Women’s Society to build community gardens at the Yellowknife Women’s Centre and Spruce Bough. During the summer, a harvest table will be set up weekly to share freshly grown produce weekly with members. Stay tuned for more updates on this year's garden. 

bottom of page